Northeast Arc Users Group

Spring Spatial Technologies Conference

Surveying the landscape of spatial technologies from ArcGIS to the Web


Monday, May 9, 2016, from 8:00 AM until 5:30 PM

University of Massachusetts Amherst  Lincoln Campus Center

Conference Map: 72° 31' 37.46" W, 42° 23' 29.57" N

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Conference Program

All DayESRI Collaboration Center
Lunch Birds-of-a-Feather Tables
Afterward NEArc User Group Forum
New! RSVP
Separately
Concurrent ESRI HackerLab
Post-Conference GeoDev Meetup
             
Sponsors:
Geocortex Logo
VHB Logo Neurisa Logo Tighe and Bond Logo
Sunday Pub Meetup
7:00 PM High Horse Brewing, 24 N. Pleasant St., Amherst, MA, just down the road from UMass.
       For those of you in town the night before the conference, please join a group of GIS locals and other attendees for conversation and good cheer.
Monday Registration & Refreshments
8:00 AM Campus Center 1st Floor
  Register online: $65 in advance — $75 after May 1 — Current Students: $35/$45 ($0 for students who Present or Volunteer, courtesy of NEURISA)
9:00 – 10:15Session 1
 Campus Center Auditorium
 
Welcome
Keynote
 
Welcome and Opening Remarks
Niels la Cour
Campus Planning, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Brett Horr, GISP
NEArc President; Town of York, Maine

10:15 – 10:30 Refreshment Break and Poster Session
  Campus Center 1st Floor Concourse
10:30 – 12:00Session 2
 
ArcGIS Platform
Public Health
Facilities Management
Workshop: Spatial Databases
Workshop: Census ACS
 Campus Center AuditoriumCampus Center 163CCampus Center 175Integrative Learning Center S120Integrative Learning Center N111
 Moderator: Brett Horr, GISPModerator: Timothy LeDouxModerator: Larry SprakerCoordinator: Emily WilsonCoordinator: Carsten Braun
✧ 10:30 AM
What’s New in ArcGIS Server
Mark Scott
Tom Schwartzman
Esri

The ArcGIS platform is rich in tools to help you manage, analyze, and present your geographic data. In this session we will discuss the role of ArcGIS Server and look at version 10.4’s new functionality and options for security and configuration.

The Geography of the Zika Virus
Andy Anderson
Amherst College

The mosquito-born Zika virus is sweeping Latin America and the Caribbean, and stories about it are flooding the news. But it’s also buzzing through the Twittersphere! Learn about the where, how, and who of Zika, and find out how to map its social network response using the Twitter Connector of the online mapping platform CartoDB.

Do More with Less: Using Spatial SQL, Data Interoperability Extension, and FME Desktop to Improve and Automate Data Integration, the Quality Control Process, and Reporting
Alexander Stepanov
Niels la Cour
University of Massachusetts Amherst

Many organizations now work with multiple data formats, including GIS, CAD, BIM, Revit, Utilities Networks, Tableau, and collections of photos/images. In this presentation we will discuss several ways to simplify and optimize data integration and translation with use of Spatial SQL, Data Interoperability extensions, and Feature Manipulation Engine (FME) Desktop.

Introduction to Using SQL for Spatial Databases
Guido Stein
Applied Geographics

If you’d like to get more comfortable writing queries with Structured Query Language (SQL) and SQL spatial data types to take advantage of your enterprise spatial data, then this workshop is a great place to start. It will introduce you to the skills you need to write PostgreSQL+PostGIS spatial queries and provide a hands-on tutorial using real data in a CartoDB test environment. Using these SQL skills you will be able to generate useful ArcSDE views with a geodatabase stored in the PostgreSQL database management system.

Here is a link to last years presentation:

http://goo.gl/kAMEqV

Your Neighborhood by the Numbers: Advanced American FactFinder (Tracts, Block Groups, and Blocks)
Alexandra Barker
US Census Bureau

This workshop is designed for data users who are already familiar with American Community Survey datasets and the American FactFinder (AFF) tool. You will learn how to access key demographic, socioeconomic, and housing indicators for nontraditional geographies such as tracts, block groups, and blocks. Users will be able to utilize these geographies to define neighborhoods and service areas and create community profiles and basic maps. During this workshop, participants will also learn how to download shapefiles using AFF.

✧ 11:00 AM
What’s New in ArcGIS Online
Mark Scott
Tom Schwartzman
Esri

The ArcGIS platform is rich in tools to help you manage, analyze, and present your geographic data. In this session we will discuss new features, as well as techniques to help you get the most out of ArcGIS Online.

An Application of the Gravity (Spatial Interaction) Model in Healthcare
Jane L. Garb, MS
Sarah Goff, MD
Haley Guhn-Knight
Baystate Health

Spatial interaction analysis models the pattern of flow between one or more origins and one or more destinations. The spatial interaction or gravity model assumes an inverse relationship between the volume of flow (interaction) and distance, and a direct relationship between the volume of flow and the attractiveness of the destination and demand at the origins (both measured by size or some other measure). The model has been used extensively to describe processes such as migration patterns, trade networks, and transportation routes.

This presentation will explain the gravity model and illustrate an application in healthcare: factors influencing choice of a pediatric practice in a sample of low-income and minority women. We defined the origins as patients, the destinations as practices, and the measure of flow as the total number of patients choosing each practice. We considered several demographic and socioeconomic measures of demand. Two measure of attractiveness were practice size and a practice quality score.

The gravity model explained 60% of the variability in practice size. Total number of patients is significantly and inversely related to average patient distance from the practice (p = 0.002) and significantly and directly related to practice size (attractiveness) (p=0.031), median patient income (attractiveness) (p = 0.02) and percent black (attractiveness) (p = 0.002). Average quality score was not a significant measure of attractiveness.

We have demonstrated that the gravity model is appropriate to describe the process of choosing a pediatrician in this population. We will also give a few other brief examples of healthcare applications.

GIS for Management of Science and Engineering Facilities
Mohammed Abdelaal
Lukasz Czarniecki
Thomas Huf
Niels la Cour
Alexander Stepanov
University of Massachusetts Amherst

The University of Massachusetts Amherst division of Campus Planning is currently developing a database and related GIS applications to help plan and manage their science and engineering facilities. This project pulls information from many different sources including the Tririga Space database, recent and past studies, and other sources with attributes unique to the needs of science and engineering research functions and teaching labs. It organizes the data in many different formats for use by both facilities and planning staff, and for high-level decision makers in space assignments, renovation, and capital investments. This presentation will illustrate the power of data interoperability and GIS to help visualize data in many ways designed to aid planners and decision makers.

✧ 11:30 AM
What’s New in ArcGIS Desktop
Mark Scott
Tom Schwartzman
Esri

The ArcGIS platform is rich in tools to help you manage, analyze, and present your geographic data. In this session we will discuss new features, as well as techniques to help you get the most out of the desktop tools, including both ArcMap and ArcGIS Pro.

 
12:00 – 1:15Lunch
 Campus Center Auditorium
 
Birds-of-a-Feather Tables
1:15 – 2:45Session 3
 
Aerial Mapping
ArcGIS Server
Government
Workshop: ArcGIS Online
Workshop: Census Jobs
 Campus Center AuditoriumCampus Center 163CCampus Center 175Integrative Learning Center S120Integrative Learning Center N111
 Moderator: Doug GreenfieldModerator: Darren Mackiewicz, GISPModerator: Ivan BrownCoordinator: Timothy LeDouxCoordinator: Andy Anderson
✧ 1:15 PM
UAS and Invasive Species Mapping: A Progress Report
Ryan Wicks
Seth Englebourg
Charles Schweik
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Ron Fortunato
Trillium Learning

“Early detection, rapid response” is a phrase used by biologists and land managers who are interested in protecting New England ecosystems from non-native plant invaders that can rapidly take over and destroy these ecosystems. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) provide potentially new capabilities in spotting these invaders for removal before they get established. In this talk, we will describe methodology we are developing to extract locations of plant species using spectral and other information generated from quadcopter imagery.

ArcGIS Server: An Interactive Exploration of Map Services and REST
Joseph Doherty
Microdesk

ArcGIS Server has set the example for implementing REST services. Programmatically there are a wealth of examples that demonstrate applying the ArcGIS REST API, but have you ever just wanted to roll up your sleeves and take a look around?

This presentation will show how to interactively access the ArcGIS Server REST API through a Web browser. It will encourage the audience to explore the services through navigation and query, while allowing them to see first hand what the data results look like.

Long Distance (Over)Haul: The Future of the MassDOT Road Inventory Update Process
Quinn Molloy
MassDOT

The Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT) Road Inventory is updated each year through the aid of vigilant municipal governments and their representatives in the GIS Services group. The advent of the Esri Roads and Highways desktop extension for versioned data editing in the form of custom user environments has greatly improved the Commonwealth’s ability to modernize the data update process and allowed data managers to transfer agency to those with greater understanding of real world conditions. Until very recently the database was maintained by a single user under direction of municipal entities when changes were made to attributes relating to Chapter 90 road funding allocation. The GIS group identified this strategy as being potentially detrimental to road data quality as many towns do not make changes to road ownership very often, but do regularly maintain their infrastructure in a way that might influence other attributes. The new road data update process will remove unnecessary paperwork, make it easier for towns to receive immediate confirmation of edits, and help to create a more accessible and accurate dataset.

Introduction to ArcGIS Online and Web AppBuilder
Krithica Kantharaj
Esri

Online mapping, once reserved for organizations contracting out Web hosting, and/or those owning the required hardware and software infrastructure, is now available to everyone. Esri’s ArcGIS Online platform allows organizations of all sizes to utilize online Web mapping solutions.

The workshop will provide a set of hands-on exercises using components of the ArcGIS Platform to create Web maps, services, and mapping applications, as well as the Web AppBuilder. Students will receive a temporary ArcGIS Online Identity, or they can use an existing organizational account. Come learn, ask questions, and have fun!

OnTheMap: The Road to Employment and Jobs Data
Alexandra Barker
US Census Bureau

This workshop is designed for data users who want to research local workforce and employment trends. The course content will include training on navigating the Local Employment Dynamics (LED) website and exploring LED tools including OntheMap and Quarterly Workforce Indicators. These tools allow data users to analyze employment, hiring, job creation and destruction, earnings, and much more for workers by industry through charts, maps, and interactive tables.

✧ 1:45 PM
Hurricane Joaquin: Using Drones in the Rapid Assessment of Effects on the Coastlines of San Salvador Island, Bahamas
Jon Caris
Alex Widstrand
Eliana Perlmutter
Smith College

Hurricane Joaquin formed in the southwest Atlantic on September 28, 2015 and several days later made landfall in the Bahamas as a Category 4 hurricane. The island of San Salvador sustained significant infrastructural damage. A rapid assessment of the storm impact on the coast was undertaken in January 2016 by a team of researchers from multiple institutions. Smith College sent a team of students to capture low-altitude imagery via drone. Visible-spectrum imagery was processed to produce orthophotos and digital surface models to complement and enhance other assessment methods including ground surveys and ground-penetrating radar.

GPV: An Open-Source ArcGIS Server Front End that Brings Information to the Masses
Michael Olkin
Town of Amherst
Jeff Amero
Sean Sweeney
City of Cambridge
Niels laCour
Sasha Stepanov
University of Massachusetts Amherst

The General Purpose Viewer (GPV) is an open-source front end for ArcGIS Server web maps developed by AppGeo and available on GitHub, which provides powerful system integration capabilities. It can access enterprise data in nearly any database management system, and is configured via tables and stored procedures in a database management system, allowing GIS users with strong database skills to leverage the technology in some very powerful ways and to stand up new applications quickly. The GPV has been deployed in over twenty city, county, and regional GIS departments to date, some of which use it as their complete public-facing GIS presence. This panel will provide a glimpse into how this technology is deployed, while reviewing several use cases for it.

The Localization of New York State GIS
Sam Wear
Westchester County GIS

After nearly three decades of Albany-based programs and committee attempts to guide and influence statewide GIS development, a set of a common – and ubiquitous – operational geospatial programs have been identified in municipal governments that clearly demonstrate the opposite need: investments and capacity-building should be at the local level. This long overdue shift in statewide “oversight and financing” must now focus on “common core” local government programs that support geospatial regulatory programs and day-to-day business needs in the areas of infrastructure management, permitting and inspections, planning and economic development, land management systems, and a wide range of health and human service delivery programs. This presentation will provide an overview of local government “common core” geospatial business needs which can provide a framework for discussion with statewide elected officials and politicians. Moving forward, NYS local government GIS programs must now take the initiative to dictate both the discussion and direction of the statewide effort.

✧ 2:15 PM
Drones for GIS Mapping
Sarah Leidinger
University of Vermont Spatial Analysis Lab

From disaster response to bridge inspection, Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) have made their presence known in a number of applications. These UAS are small, lightweight, aerial vehicles that can be rapidly deployed to cover small areas of interest, producing GIS-ready orthorectified imagery and 3D point clouds in a matter of hours. This presentation will examine a variety of UAS technologies, their capabilities and limitations, and offer numerous case studies in which these drones have offered a new perspective.

 
2:45 – 3:00 Refreshment Break and Poster Session
  Campus Center 1st Floor Concourse
3:00 – 4:30Session 4
 
ArcGIS Online
Landscapes
Education
Workshop: Field Operations
 
 Campus Center AuditoriumCampus Center 163CCampus Center 175Integrative Learning Center S120
 Moderator: Brett Horr, GISPModerator: Heather McCannModerator: Katie WeaverCoordinator: Pam Brangan, GISP 
✧ 3:00 PM
“Demystifying” ArcGIS Online
Larry Spraker
VHB

ArcGIS Online is a powerful mapping platform from Esri for any organization which certainly lives up to billing of “connecting maps, apps, data, and people.” However, inherent in this powerful platform exists a significant amount of new technology, terminology, cost structures, security, and application deployment methods which have many seeking clarification and a better understanding before moving forward.

This talk will attempt to “demystify” ArcGIS Online, its terminology, and show attendees how to efficiently leverage the platform for your organization. Terms such as items, groups, feature layer, and web map will be explained, and many topics will be covered such as: publishing data and services, managing named users, how and why to organize content into groups, credit usage vs. free functionality, implementing security, and building/deploying apps using both templates and Web App Builder.

Spatial Statistical Network Models for Stream and River Temperature in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, USA
Alisa Morrison
Naomi Detenbeck
US EPA

Regional temperature models are needed for characterizing and mapping stream thermal regimes, establishing reference conditions, predicting future impacts, and identifying critical thermal refugia. Spatial statistical models have been developed to improve regression modeling techniques by taking into account spatial covariance structures inherent in stream networks. Unlike earlier approaches, these models describe spatial autocorrelation based on distance along flow networks as well as standard Euclidean distances between observation points.

Our goal for this study is to develop predictive models describing the thermal regime of streams across the Chesapeake Bay Watershed using landscape attributes as well as meteorological variables. We developed a database of Chesapeake Bay monitoring stations using existing stream temperature time series data obtained from state, federal, and nongovernmental sources. After applying quality control criteria, we described thermal regimes of rivers and streams based on a set of reduced metrics chosen through principal component analysis. We used a variety of GIS tools to develop parameters chosen as independent variables in our models, and to facilitate watershed processing. Landscape networks were developed using the NHDPlus hydrographic dataset and the Spatial Tools for the Analysis of Rivers (STARS) geoprocessing toolset.

We predicted monthly median July stream temperatures as a function of air temperature, drainage density, land cover, main channel slope, watershed storage, percent coarse-grained surficial deposits, stream flow and velocity and watershed area, with an overall root-mean-square prediction error of 1.5 °C. Predictive models for the remaining variables are being developed.

Blended Learning, Design Thinking, and Open-Source Technology in the Smith College Interterm GIS Workshop
Scott Gilman
Smith College

The Smith College Spatial Analysis Lab teaches a yearly, week-long GIS workshop for students of all disciplines. This year, we made some major changes: using a blended-learning model, instructing with QGIS, and incorporating hands-on activities with transparency map layers to teach geoprocessing tools as concepts of spatial thinking before teaching them as a series of clicks. This talk will describe the new curriculum and evaluate how well it met our goals and our students’ needs.

Field Operations with Collector for ArcGIS
Mark Scott
Esri

Extending GIS into the field is one of the fastest growing sectors in the industry, driven largely by the advancements and availability of smart phones and tablet devices. In this workshop you will see demonstrations of building services and Web maps to be used in Collector for ArcGIS. Participants will then use their own mobile devices to collect assets both in an online and offline mode, and review them in a dashboard. Note: Participants must bring their own mobile device with Collector for ArcGIS installed. Visit the Collector Web site to determine which devices are supported.

 
✧ 3:30 PM
Using Maps in Your Story Map Journal
Katie Grillo
City of Cambridge, MA

The Story Map Journal is gaining popularity and quickly becoming one of the most popular Story Map apps. Even though this is a Story map, the application does not actually require any maps at all. Get some insider tips for creating Map Notes and using ArcGIS Online Maps to create your own map to use in the Story Map Journal.

Mapping (Shrinking) Glaciers Using GPS, GIS, and Remote Sensing: Examples from the Canadian High Arctic, Peru, Venezuela, and Kilimanjaro
Carsten Braun
Westfield State University
Douglas Hardy
University of Massachusetts Amherst
David Chadwell
Scripps Institution of Oceanography

The recession and ultimate disappearance of glaciers is arguably one of the most visible consequences of global climate change today, with significant impacts on water resources around the world. Here we present a series of case studies from the Canadian High Arctic, Peru, Venezuela, and Kilimanjaro highlighting some of the evolving technologies and approaches used in glacier mapping. These include qualitative information from historical sources (e.g. old photographs, field sketches, explorer journals, etc.), semi-quantitative sources (e.g. historical topographic maps and aerial photography), in-situ mapping of ice margins using simple and differentially-corrected GPS, and a variety of modern remote sensing data including satellite images and digital elevation models.

One of the biggest challenges is the vertical domain (i.e. thickness) of a glacier as it is generally fairly-straightforward to map the ice margin position (and thus its horizontal recession over time) either in the field using GPS or from satellite images. We have recently completed an innovative study where we re-measured the surface elevation of the Quelccaya Ice Cap (QIC, Peru) in 2013/2015 using dual-frequency kinematic GPS at 46/6 sites first measured in 1983/1978 using terrestrial surveying methods. The summit of QIC has lowered by about 4.4 m over thirty years and surface elevation lowering increased towards the western margin to a maximum ice loss of over 60 m accompanied by an ice margin retreat of about 300 m. Increasing air temperature is likely a major driver of these observed changes.

4-H Geospatial Education and Geomentors
Kim Pond
UMass Extension 4-H YDP
Linda Horn
UMass Extension

Engage youth in Geospatial Education and help develop the GIS professionals of tomorrow’s workforce. The 4-H Youth Development Program, an outreach program of the Land-Grant University System, with a partnership with ESRI and the AAGS GeoMentor program, has developed a model that brings youth and adults together in its 4-H Geospatial Education program. Come learn about this partnership, how you may get involved, and some of the resources from the Geospatial Curriculum, our 2013 National Youth Science Day (NYSD) Experiment, Maps to Apps, and our upcoming 2016 NYSD topic on Drones and Remote Sensing.

✧ 4:00 PM
Using ESRI’s WebAppBuilder to Create an Interactive Parks Guide
Doug Greenfield
City of Newton, MA

ESRI’s WebAppBuilder tool makes it easy to create nice looking, mobile-friendly apps without programming. The tool is available in ArcGIS Online. The City of Newton has created apps for Parks, Conservation Areas, and Zoning. These can be embedded into existing web pages or run independently. Benefits, shortcomings, and the work flow for this process will be discussed.

Mapping Human Use in the Mid-Atlantic Ocean
Zach Singer-Leavitt
RPS Applied Science Associates

The Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean (MARCO) contracted with RPS Applied Science Associates and SeaPlan to develop synthesized spatial products characterizing human use in the Mid-Atlantic region. This effort supports ocean planning priorities and goals, builds on existing datasets and Web-based ocean planning tools, ensures credibility by vetting the final products through stakeholder engagement, and uses a consistent, transparent approach for addressing data limitations.;

This presentation will focus on the spatial and statistical methods used to summarize a large number of disparate data layers (including recreational uses, commercial shipping and fishing, military uses, renewable energy, infrastructure, and more) into streamlined, interpretable products for resource managers and the public. The presentation will also address methods for developing “use intensity” metrics, dealing with data gaps, and communicating uncertainty. Finally, the presentation will include a brief demo of the Mid-Atlantic Ocean Data Portal, an interactive ocean mapping and information site which houses the synthesized products. This project represents the first time such data have been synthesized in a comprehensive manner, and indicates much about what we do and do not know about ocean use in the Mid-Atlantic region.

Community Service with Web-Based GIST
Andy Anderson
Amherst College
Jon Caris
Smith College
Charles Schweik
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Scott Gilman
Smith College

This past year a team of technoacademics from the Five Colleges joined together to design, build, and implement a new course on Web-based geographic information science and technology (GIST). As is common with many GIS courses students were broken into small teams that worked on projects together. The projects were service-oriented, producing Web sites and interactive maps that benefited our institutions and other community organizations, and interdisciplinary, running the gamut from the geological to the conservational to the sociopolitical. Blended learning was a foundation of the course, with most materials provided online, and before class students were expected to review it, work exercises, and answer quiz questions. Once in class they actively applied what they learned to real data sets relevant to their projects, where their efforts were not so clear-cut and needed more hands-on support. As a result the course on most days was “flipped” or “workshopped”. The course also had an explicit focus on open learning, relying on open-source technology, open data sets, and openly licensed content written by ourselves or others.

4:30 – ? NEArc User Group Forum / Open Discussion / Poster Contest Winner Announcement
  Campus Center U-Pub (Second Floor)
All DayPosters
 Campus Center 1st Floor Concourse
 Coordinator: Leslie Pelch and Mark Haberle
 
Posters: Ecosystems
Posters: Ecosystems
Posters: Conservation
Posters: Landscapes
Posters: Landscapes
 
Use of L-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) for Ecosystems Applications
Tracy Whelen
Microwave Remote Sensing Laboratory, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is an active-microwave remote-sensing technique that is able to give information about the structure and moisture content of whatever the radar reflects off of, and is able to provide data at all times of day in all weather conditions. The sensitivity of L-band SAR to vegetation structure, surface roughness, and soil moisture makes it particularly useful for a wide range of ecosystems applications, including biomass and carbon accounting, land cover classification, and wetland monitoring. SAR has the potential to enhance and expand the information gathered from other remote sensing systems. NASA’s currently active airborne L-band SAR system, UAVSAR, and the upcoming L-band SAR satellite, NISAR, provide plenty of opportunities for increased use of SAR data for ecosystems research and monitoring. This poster gives a brief introduction to UAVSAR and NISAR, and gives examples of how SAR can be used for ecosystems applications.

Using GIS to Predict Effects of Landscape Metrics on Genetic Diversity in R. Atratulus
Sophie Breitbart
Wesleyan University

Objective: Create a GIS-based model that predicts patterns of genetic variation for the Eastern Blacknose Dace, Rhinichthys atratulus, based on the presence of environmental factors such as land cover type and elevation.

Background: Ecological processes and landscape characteristics exert considerable evolutionary pressure on an organism’s genome, recognizable in population genetic structure and variation. Quantifying patterns of such genetic variation in relation to environmental variables such as land cover, elevation, and soil composition may offer insight into how physically divided populations are driven towards divergence via allopatric speciation in geographically restricted environments such as riparian corridors.

Methods: I used genetic diversity data from R. atratalus that were derived from two mitochondrial genes and nine microsatellite loci from fish sampled from 92 sites across eastern North America and a suite of 19 Bioclim raster environmental datasets to 1) identify the environmental factors influencing R. atratalus genetic diversity at the regional scale, and 2) generate regional prediction maps of potential genetic diversity of R. atratalus across the study region. Raster data analyses were performed in ArcMap 10.2.2 and genetic diversity maps were generated using the random forest algorithm in the R Statistical Language.

Key findings: R. atratalus genetic diversity was significantly influenced by local environmental factors. Hydrologically meaningful predictors were the most important predictors of dace genetic diversity at local and regional scales. The results of this study are useful for identifying which and through what patterns environmental variables impose significant evolutionary pressure on the genetic diversity of R. atratulus.

Wildlife Habitat Linkages Surrounding Lake George and Southern Lake Champlain
Sam Talbot
Ecological Planning Program - University of Vermont

Conservation priorities – when developed systematically and objectively – can maximize land protection efforts in heterogeneous landscapes susceptible to parcelization and development. One such region surrounds Lake George and Southern Lake Champlain, nestled between the Green and Adirondack Mountains. This mosaic of conserved and private parcels sits upon an array of forest, agriculture, wetland, and development valuable to both humans and resident wildlife species. This landscape’s inherent connectedness provides many benefits to wildlife, including species richness, enhanced persistence, and increased genetic interchange. However, it is difficult to make definitive statements about potential wildlife movement through such complex matrices. Therefore, wildlife modeling approaches have evolved to paint a clearer picture of landscape connectivity.

Sam Talbot, ecological planning graduate student at the University of Vermont, worked with the Lake Champlain Land Trust and Lake George Land Conservancy to incorporate landscape connectivity and wildlife corridors into their strategic conservation planning efforts. This project, including a least-cost corridor analysis of the region to highlight large swaths of contiguous habitat, provides the information critical to such conservation efforts. Using the ArcGIS program CorridorDesigner to conduct the analysis, with custom model parameters, identifies three discrete latitudinal corridors between large established wildland blocks. These outputs were then evaluated and compared based on several landscape factors. Ultimately, this study will inform conservation and management decisions, as well as enhance dialogue among local conservation organizations.

Scripting the Intercardinal Metric Using Python
Nicholas P. Taliceo
Westfield State University

In landscape ecology, the aggregation index is a landscape metric used to quantify the relationship between landscape types and their boundaries. This landscape metric is particularly useful, for example, in wetland areas and coastal regions when evaluating the likelihood of erosion in erosion-prone and otherwise sensitive areas. The aggregation index is determined by calculating the relative N/S/W/E adjacencies of a raster grid and comparing the result to its theoretically optimal grid configuration. In practice, calculating the aggregation index is a complex analytical procedure that involves the use of gridded data (e.g. from ArcGIS Desktop) and then converting it for use in third party software (FRAGSTATS) to interpret the data and calculate the aggregation index.

In this analysis, I present a new and more complex algorithm known as the intercardinal metric that measures not only the adjacencies measured in the aggregation index, but also takes into account the NW/NE/SW/SE adjacencies of diagonally-adjacent cells. This represents a more realistic representation of the landscape and its spatial variability and yields more robust and realistic results. This new algorithm is implemented as an ArcGIS Desktop geoprocessing tool using a Python script, and is therefore more user-friendly as all computations are calculated within ArcGIS Desktop without the need to invoke third-party software.

Mauna Loa Pyroducts as an Analogue for Martian Pyroducts
Jesse Tarnas
Wesleyan University

Martian lava tubes (pyroducts) will be an important area of future Martian astrobiology research because they are shielded from the radiation and extreme temperature shifts present on the Martian surface. It is difficult to robotically explore pyroducts on Mars due to terrain and signal constraints, but future missions may be able to inspect pyroduct entry points. For now, the entrances to these caves must be mapped.

Mauna Loa, the largest shield volcano on Earth, provides our best analogue for the massive shield volcanos on Mars. A map of 1200 pyroduct entry points has been made on ArcGIS and the geometry of many entrances has been mapped out. The formation of entrances to pyroducts can be characterized by speleothems as ice, marine, saline marine, or non-hydrated, and research on Mauna Loa’s pyroducts will likely occur in the near future. Ice pyroduct entry points will be distinguished from non-hydrated entry points, and land entry points that connect to marine pyroducts will also be distinguished from non-hydrated points. The map includes topographic information regarding Mauna Loa, which are used to find correlations between pyroduct entry point formation, slope, and elevation. The macroscopic distribution pattern of entry points has also been analyzed. Many entrances associated with documented recent flows are labelled as such. This map will be useful in determining the optimal locations for pyroduct entry point searches using the HiRISE camera on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

 
Assessing the Correlation Between Cyathea Cooperi Leaf Shape Characteristics and Climate in Queensland, Australia
Jed Siebert
Wesleyan University

It has been known for around a century that several aspects of leaf shape characteristics correlate significantly with climate variables. For example, in regions with colder climates, there are generally more leaves with serrated margins, or teeth. Fossil leaf physiognomy (size and shape) can help paleobotanists estimate the climate of a certain region based upon the known connections between physiognomy and climate. Up until now, these known correlations are only calibrated for angiosperm leaves, so we can only use leaf fossils from that group. Expanding upon this tool to include evolutionarily more ancient species would allow paleobotanists to better estimate terrestrial climates further back in Earth history. Here, I examine the correlation between certain leaf shape characteristics of Cyathea cooperi, a tree fern native to Queensland, Australia, and yearly temperature and precipitation levels using a high-resolution interpolated GIS climate data set (Hijmans et al., 2005) and data collected from 14 tree fern samples. The results show that there is indeed a strong connection between leaf shape characteristics and climate variables. This study also demonstrates the applicability of GIS in paleobotany and paleoclimatology.

Solidago Randii in the Green Mountain National Forest
Molly Elvin
Green Mountain College

There are many plant species in the Green Mountain National Forest (GMNF) that are endangered, threatened, or rare. The struggle with monitoring these species lies with the expansive 624 square miles that the park covers. Even if the criteria for the ideal habitat is well known, it still takes hours of pouring over maps or working with a GIS to be able to identify potential habitats. I witnessed this process firsthand as I created maps depicting where sticky goldenrod, Solidago randii, is most likely to be found in the GMNF. To expedite this process, I made a model along with my maps that allows the user to input the values that apply to their species and get an output of a map showing where that species is most likely to be located. This model will be extremely useful in the future as botanists or volunteers attempt to locate and monitor these delicate populations.

Coyote Habitat Fragmentation within New York State
Adam Nelson
Daniel Winters
Daniel Bogan
Katherine Meierdiercks
Siena College

The purpose of this study is to classify habitat fragmentation within the state of New York with regards to how fragmentation affects habitats for specific groups of species based on their range sizes and movement capabilities. We have generated GIS layers that display habitat fragmentation for specific species that will be invaluable for wildlife conservation efforts, as they will allow for analysts to understand where larger, more suitable habitat fragments for a certain species are located in New York State. Habitat fragmentation is determined based on the specific needs of the target species and then ideal habitats are mapped using data from the National Landcover Database. A spatial analysis of the targeted data is used to produce GIS layers showing true habitat fragmentation levels affecting coyote and other species’ habitats based on the newly formed criteria.

Estimating the Glacial Recession of the Quelccaya Ice Cap in Peru Using Remote Sensing
Willys A Ramos
Carsten Braun
Timothy LeDoux
Westfield State University

The Quelccaya Ice Cap of Peru, the world’s largest tropical glacier, is susceptible to climatic variations that are the result of global warming. Changes in size, shape, and mass can be measured over time and compared to large weather events such as El Niño in order to study resulting hydrologic transformations and how they affect local ecosystems and human vulnerability. Glacier recession resulting from climate change has been observed throughout the world for decades; the results impact human and natural ecosystems in different forms. Depletion and degradation of water supplies are some of the most concerning aspects and highlight the importance of monitoring glacier recession. This research utilizes Landsat imagery from 1975 to 2015 and multispectral remote sensing techniques such as threshold band rationing, normalized difference snow index (NDSI) and supervised classification to estimate the recession of the Quelccaya ice cap and to determine which method is better at identifying the changing glacial extents.

Initial results indicate that the glacier has lost roughly 23% of its area since 1975. Moreover, the recession of the Quelccaya Ice Cap has accelerated significantly in the past 10 years. Results from this analysis were compared to similar studies found in the scientific literature. Additional findings indicate that the NDSI method of analysis did not distinguish snow from glacial ice as accurately as the other two methods, however all three methods yielded similar results.

Mapping “Pristine” Tessera Regions on Venus
Avi Stein
Wesleyan University

From isotope fractionation, we know Venus used to have huge reserves of water, but has since lost almost all of it. Unfortunately, nearly the entire surface has been melted over recently (~500 Mya), obscuring any mineralogical clues. About 10% of the surface (the tessera regions) is older than this global resurfacing event, and may provide a window to the past.

We used satellite imagery of Venus and raster analysis tools in ArcMap to identify the tessera regions. When impactors hit Venus, they propel ejecta into the upper atmosphere, and the western wind blows it into a parabolic shape, sometimes covering the tesserae. The first part of this project modeled the impact ejecta blankets, marking where they covered and obscured the tesserae. Once the remaining clean tessera regions were mapped, the next step was to extract the variations in the radar properties (elevation, slope, emissivity) of the regions to determine which areas could be considered “pristine,” and targets for advanced mineralogical study. Through these analyses, we were able to effectively identify target areas for future Venus missions.

 
Quabbin Reservation Land Cover and Hunting Dynamics
Ryan Cleveland
Westfield State University

With few natural predators in the region, deer remain a threat to the regeneration of young forest cover in the Quabbin Reservation. The potential for overgrazing on young forest threatens the production of clean drinking water for Boston and its suburbs, over 2 million people. The forested watershed acts as a kind of biological filter for the water that is collected in the Quabbin Reservoir. The forest takes up nutrients in the soils that stimulate growth such as phosphates and nitrates. If these nutrients are not absorbed into the young forest they may reach the water body. Algae then absorb the nutrients and rapidly reproduce which could lead to severe water quality issues. This study used Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to examine hunter movement habits, existing forest cover, and deer harvests to better understand how deer hunters used the landscape. The GPS data will also help to determine if some areas of the Quabbin Reservation serve as un-hunted refuges for deer. The survey group only represents a small portion of the total number of hunters involved. Early findings indicate that the average hunter is between 50-70 years old and travels about 400 meters from a road on average while seeking potential dear population centers.

Using Cluster Identification to Determine the Association Between Cyanobacterial Toxins and Alzheimer’s Disease
Alexandra McIntyre
Dylan O’Donnell
Leslie Rodriguez
Ho-Zhen Chen
Kira Trunfio
Mi-Hyun Park
University of Massachusetts Amherst

Algal blooms pose a public health risk because of their toxins. Recent findings suggest that a neurotoxin produced by cyanobacteria, BMAA, induces neurodegeneration and can result in neurodegenerative diseases. Because the link between BMMA and neurodegeneration is recent, the potential link between cyanobacteria and Alzheimer’s disease is exceedingly relevant. We investigated the association between neurodegenerative diseases, specifically Alzheimer’s, and cyanobacterial toxins, conducting a GIS cluster identification for freshwater sources in Kansas with harmful algal blooms (HABs) within the past 10 years. It was found that counties in Kansas that are nearby or that receive drinking water from sources with HABs exhibit a higher incidence of Alzheimer’s disease when compared to counties that were not exposed to HABs. Environmental factors are the likely cause of similar diseases, and research supporting this notion could have massive implications for thousands.

GIS and the Middlesex Land Trust: Potential Land Management Pathways
Pierre Gerard
Laura Dempsey
Wesleyan University

The Middlesex Land Trust preserves over 1,000 acres of land in Middlesex County, Connecticut, through 51 preserves with varying levels of infrastructure and visitor accessibility. While static maps of the preserves are maintained on the Land Trust’s website, there was a need to make the maps more publicly accessible and easier to manage. We created a Story Map Journal for the Middlesex Land Trust on ArcGIS Online, to integrate information about each of the preserves with interactive maps. In addition, we will have performed a series of spatial analyses, including: 1) a hiking difficulty rating scale for a selection of mapped trails and 2) ranking the conservation value of the preserves through available land-use change, invasive species, protected habitat, and habitat suitability data. Organizations like the Middlesex Land Trust can benefit from the use of GIS products, as more publicly-available spatial information creates opportunities for a stronger connection between land trusts and the communities they serve.

Forest Fire Impact Zones in California
Katelyn Tamargo
David Araujo
Shannon Beaton
Kelsey Hopkins
Erik Schoumaker
University of Massachusetts Amherst

Throughout the state of California, deadly forest fires have gotten out of control and are putting residents at risk. The current drought throughout the California region has made this problem particularly hard to combat. This study aims to find a correlation between geographical characteristics and where fires occur in the region to eventually determine prevention techniques. Using various GIS data layers, this study will create a spatial representation of forest fires in correlation to the range of precipitation data in California. This study will also evaluate the effects of human and natural causes of wildfires across the state. The results of this study will provide information about current fire prevention outlets, as well as areas where more attention of fire safety needs to be given in the state of California. Using the risk analysis assessment, this will provide affected communities with insight into what is currently happening with fire safety and give those communities suggestions of ways to improve upon fire safety.

The Mexico Ocean Data Portal
Zach Singer-Leavitt
RPS Applied Science Associates

The Mexico Ocean Data Portal is a Story Map designed to highlight publicly-available ocean data layers in the Gulf of Mexico to support environmental characterization and impact assessment. In some cases, data layers have been synthesized or analyzed to enhance their value to the offshore oil and gas industry. However, all data display and web functionality were constructed with out-of-the-box ESRI Story Maps technology.

 
Posters: Hydrology
Posters: Climate Change
Posters: Climate Change
Posters: Government
Posters: History
 
Geospatial Analyses of Hudson River Subwatershed Land Use and Roadway Characteristics
Nicole Smith
Brian Donahoo
Katherine Meierdiercks
Siena College

Siena College is working with other academic and research institutions in New York State (including Bard College, the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, and Cornell University) in order to put together a comprehensive summary of watershed characteristics and examine relationships between these watershed characteristics and winter road-salt delivery to stream channels. Researching effects of road salts on stream channels and watersheds is important because runoff from road salts can have detrimental effects on ecosystem health. The goal of this project is to use GIS to compute and map a number of landscape characteristics for multiple Hudson River subwatersheds such as road-lane density, road-channel proximity, and distance-weighted imperviousness. Results highlight mechanisms important for road-salt delivery to stream channels throughout the Hudson River Watershed.

Impacts of Sea Level Rise in Chelsea, Massachusetts: A GIS Analysis
Damen Fini
Carsten Braun
Westfield State University

Sea level rise (SLR) caused by human-induced global warming is arguably one of the most pressing global environmental issue of our times and the relative impacts of SLR tend to have the greatest effect on the most economically vulnerable people. Glaciers are currently shrinking at accelerated rates and a recent scientific study suggests that SLR could reach more than 6 feet by 2100 and more than 50 feet by 2500 due to potential instabilities of the two Antarctic ice sheets. In Massachusetts, much of the Greater Boston area is situated on the coast and SLR could potentially have a devastating impact on these communities.

The purpose of this GIS-based study was to analyze and visualize the environmental, social, and economic impacts of SLR (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 15 meters) in the town of Chelsea, Massachusetts, specifically in terms of inundated town area, number of displaced people, and impacted critical civic and transportation infrastructure. This analysis also includes a more detailed assessment of the socio-economic characteristics of the displaced people as well as SLR impacts on ecological habitat, land use, and freshwater resources.

The results of this analysis are compared to similar assessments such as Climate Central Surging Seas and Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding Impacts by NOAA for consistency and additional context. The presented maps, analysis, and online visualizations can be used to determine a plan of action and to prioritize and implement effective mitigation strategies and adaptation measures as soon as possible.

Impacts of Sea Level Rise in Revere, Massachusetts
Elisha Jameson
Carsten Braun
Westfield State University

Sea level rise (SLR) caused by human-induced global warming is arguably one of the most pressing global environmental issue of our times and the relative impacts of SLR tend to have the greatest effect on the most economically vulnerable people. Glaciers are currently shrinking at accelerated rates and a recent scientific study suggests that SLR could reach more than 6 feet by 2100 and more than 50 feet by 2500 due to potential instabilities of the two Antarctic ice sheets. In Massachusetts, much of the Greater Boston area is situated on the coast and SLR could potentially have a devastating impact on these communities.

The purpose of this GIS-based study was to analyze and visualize the environmental, social, and economic impacts of SLR (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 15 meters) in the town of Revere, Massachusetts, specifically in terms of inundated town area, number of displaced people, and impacted critical civic and transportation infrastructure. This analysis also includes a more detailed assessment of the socio-economic characteristics of the displaced people as well as SLR impacts on ecological habitat, land use, and freshwater resources.

The results of this analysis are compared to similar assessments such as Climate Central Surging Seas and Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding Impacts by NOAA for consistency and additional context. The presented maps, analysis, and online visualizations can be used to determine a plan of action and to prioritize and implement effective mitigation strategies and adaptation measures as soon as possible.

Impact of UMass Students on Amherst Traffic
Carly Zinner
Roseann Tortola
Ryan Daigle
Dawn Nims
Brandon Gale
Mi-Hyun Park
University of Massachusetts Amherst

This study aims to evaluate the current transportation system in Amherst, MA using traffic counter and bus data over a three month period. Traffic count data is taken from the two major routes in and out of town: Route 116 and Route 9 for February, March, and April of 2015. Bus routes along these two major roadways are analyzed for delays of buses along their routes in order to find a correlation between the traffic impact of UMass Amherst in session vs. out of session on the surrounding town. Spring break week is used as the out of session time period within the three months of data. The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology will be implemented to evaluate the impact of the University of Massachusetts on traffic in the town of Amherst.

Integrating History with Space-Time Cluster Analysis to Examine the Evolution of Episcopal Mobility in Medieval England
Stephanie Ling
Gary Shaw
Wesleyan University

The extensive religious and often political influence of bishops in medieval England makes the study of their mobility integral to understanding the social and political settings of that area and time period. Since spiritual and bureaucratic worlds demanded frequent movement, travel was an important component of a bishop’s occupation. On account of their fundamentally administrative religious role, bishops, like lords and kings, commonly kept careful records of their letters and religious grants. Further, these records fortuitously document their travels, from which we have extracted their itineraries, egocentric accounts of their work, and influence throughout their tenure. The availability of this data allows for the possibility to quantitatively and qualitatively analyze changes in episcopal mobility over time through the use of GIS software. By considering a few bishops’ itineraries from the dioceses of Canterbury and Bath and Wells spanning the 12th to 15th centuries, we conducted an analysis of movement and its patterns — such as those due to seasonality, location-specific details (e.g., the bishop owns the home or the location is a renovated castle), and religious events — and how they change over time. We developed a systematic, replicable method of examination by combining statistical results from space-time cluster and outlier analysis with historical inferences that can be applied to the remaining sixty itineraries in order to derive a critical examination of where, how, and why episcopal mobility progressed and evolved over time.

 
Multiple Watershed Analysis: Investigating Land-Use Impact on Surface Water Quality
Victoria Taylor
Jesse O’Donnell
Neil Mechin
Abigail Ericson
Molly Bialecki
Mi-Hyun Park
University of Massachusetts Amherst

The quality of rivers and streams may vary due to land-cover patterns within their neighboring watershed. Amidst a water-quality crisis in the United States, as highlighted by recent examples such as Flint, Michigan, preserving and restoring water sources to pristine condition are a top priority. As population and development increases, land-cover change will also increase, resulting in deterioration of water quality. This study analyzes the relationship between land cover and water quality in multiple watersheds in the Northeastern United States.

The data was collected from the Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics Consortium for land cover, and the National Water Quality Monitoring Council for water quality. Using a geographic information system, we automated a process to collect the data from monitoring stations, extracting land cover information for each delineated watershed. We then defined summary statistics, such as the proportions of each land-use type in a watershed. The result of multiple watershed analysis shows that land cover directly affects the quality of receiving water as watersheds containing high percentages of urban development discharge more pollution to the receiving water. With this knowledge, state and local managers and planners can protect drinking water sources and make the best possible development decisions.

A GIS Analysis of Sea Level Rise Impacts in Cohasset, Massachusetts
Melissa Higley
Carsten Braun
Westfield State University

Sea level rise (SLR) caused by human-induced global warming is arguably one of the most pressing global environmental issue of our times and the relative impacts of SLR tend to have the greatest effect on the most economically vulnerable people. Glaciers are currently shrinking at accelerated rates and a recent scientific study suggests that SLR could reach more than 6 feet by 2100 and more than 50 feet by 2500 due to potential instabilities of the two Antarctic ice sheets. In Massachusetts, much of the Greater Boston area is situated on the coast and SLR could potentially have a devastating impact on these communities.

The purpose of this GIS-based study was to analyze and visualize the environmental, social, and economic impacts of SLR (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 15 meters) in the town of Cohasset, Massachusetts, specifically in terms of inundated town area, number of displaced people, and impacted critical civic and transportation infrastructure. This analysis also includes a more detailed assessment of the socio-economic characteristics of the displaced people as well as SLR impacts on ecological habitat, land use, and freshwater resources.

The results of this analysis are compared to similar assessments such as Climate Central Surging Seas and Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding Impacts by NOAA for consistency and additional context. The presented maps, analysis, and online visualizations can be used to determine a plan of action and to prioritize and implement effective mitigation strategies and adaptation measures as soon as possible.

Impacts of Sea Level Rise in Saugus, Massachusetts: A GIS Analysis
Stephanie Ladas
Carsten Braun
Westfield State University

Sea level rise (SLR) caused by human-induced global warming is arguably one of the most pressing global environmental issue of our times and the relative impacts of SLR tend to have the greatest effect on the most economically vulnerable people. Glaciers are currently shrinking at accelerated rates and a recent scientific study suggests that SLR could reach more than 6 feet by 2100 and more than 50 feet by 2500 due to potential instabilities of the two Antarctic ice sheets. In Massachusetts, much of the Greater Boston area is situated on the coast and SLR could potentially have a devastating impact on these communities.

The purpose of this GIS-based study was to analyze and visualize the environmental, social, and economic impacts of SLR (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 15 meters) in the town of Saugus, Massachusetts, specifically in terms of inundated town area, number of displaced people, and impacted critical civic and transportation infrastructure. This analysis also includes a more detailed assessment of the socio-economic characteristics of the displaced people as well as SLR impacts on ecological habitat, land use, and freshwater resources.

The results of this analysis are compared to similar assessments such as Climate Central Surging Seas and Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding Impacts by NOAA for consistency and additional context. The presented maps, analysis, and online visualizations can be used to determine a plan of action and to prioritize and implement effective mitigation strategies and adaptation measures as soon as possible.

Visualizing Prison Gerrymandering Using Cartograms
Orlando Rodriguez
CT Latino and Puerto Rican Affairs Commission

Two cartograms were created using an ArcGIS script. The cartograms show the distribution of prison populations in Connecticut compared to the hometowns of the incarcerated population. This was used to inform legislators on how political representation is skewed to benefit prison towns at the expense of non-prison towns. Furthermore, the political representation of minority populations is reduced when minorities are incarcerated in rural areas that are predominately non-Hispanic white.

 
 
Soil Transmissivity Index: A New Geospatial Environmental Coverage for Environmental Assessment in Rhode Island
Marissa Simpson
Art Gold
Kelly Addy
Soni Pradhanang
University of Rhode Island

TOPMODEL is a rainfall runoff model that can provide high resolution, spatially explicit estimates of areas of soil wetness and surface runoff networks (Betson 1964, Beven and Freer 1996). TOPMODEL uses topography, soil conductivity, and soil depth to create an index of soil transmissivity index (STI). In this study, TOPMODEL was used to create a spatially explicit raster-based model of STI for the state of Rhode Island.

The STI was used to investigate potential connectivity via intermittent streams between “isolated wetlands” and perennial streams. The model was calibrated using a study area in Southern Rhode Island where field data on hydroperiods had been obtained on 12 intermittent streams, each originating at a hillslope wetland. The geolocations of each intermittent stream and wetland were obtained by field survey with GPS and a “trace” depicting these features was transferred into ArcGIS. A threshold STI value that depicted the intermittent streams was then determined by comparing the STI to stream traces.

The STI was also compared to RIGIS 1:5K streams and the National Hydrologic Dataset (NHD) 1:24K streams. The STI was substantially more successful at depicting the intermittent streams that extend from the 12 wetland sites than the RIGIS 1:5K Streams and NHD 1:24K streams. This analysis demonstrates the value of TOPMODEL to provide insights for determining connectivity between isolated wetlands and perennial stream networks.

Impacts of Sea Level Rise in Lynn, Massachusetts: A GIS Analysis
Alex Carini
Carsten Braun
Westfield State University

Sea level rise (SLR) caused by human-induced global warming is arguably one of the most pressing global environmental issue of our times and the relative impacts of SLR tend to have the greatest effect on the most economically vulnerable people. Glaciers are currently shrinking at accelerated rates and a recent scientific study suggests that SLR could reach more than 6 feet by 2100 and more than 50 feet by 2500 due to potential instabilities of the two Antarctic ice sheets. In Massachusetts, much of the Greater Boston area is situated on the coast and SLR could potentially have a devastating impact on these communities.

The purpose of this GIS-based study was to analyze and visualize the environmental, social, and economic impacts of SLR (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 15 meters) in the town of Lynn, Massachusetts, specifically in terms of inundated town area, number of displaced people, and impacted critical civic and transportation infrastructure. This analysis also includes a more detailed assessment of the socio-economic characteristics of the displaced people as well as SLR impacts on ecological habitat, land use, and freshwater resources.

The results of this analysis are compared to similar assessments such as Climate Central Surging Seas and Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding Impacts by NOAA for consistency and additional context. The presented maps, analysis, and online visualizations can be used to determine a plan of action and to prioritize and implement effective mitigation strategies and adaptation measures as soon as possible.

A GIS Analysis of Sea Level Rise Impacts on Weymouth, Massachusetts
Liam Anderson
Westfield State University

Sea level rise (SLR) caused by human-induced global warming is arguably one of the most pressing global environmental issue of our times and the relative impacts of SLR tend to have the greatest effect on the most economically vulnerable people. Glaciers are currently shrinking at accelerated rates and a recent scientific study suggests that SLR could reach more than 6 feet by 2100 and more than 50 feet by 2500 due to potential instabilities of the two Antarctic ice sheets. In Massachusetts, much of the Greater Boston area is situated on the coast and SLR could potentially have a devastating impact on these communities.

The purpose of this GIS-based study was to analyze and visualize the environmental, social, and economic impacts of SLR (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 15 meters) in the town of Weymouth, Massachusetts, specifically in terms of inundated town area, number of displaced people, and impacted critical civic and transportation infrastructure. This analysis also includes a more detailed assessment of the socio-economic characteristics of the displaced people as well as SLR impacts on ecological habitat, land use, and freshwater resources.

The results of this analysis are compared to similar assessments such as Climate Central Surging Seas and Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding Impacts by NOAA for consistency and additional context. The presented maps, analysis, and online visualizations can be used to determine a plan of action and to prioritize and implement effective mitigation strategies and adaptation measures as soon as possible.

Industrial Air Toxin Tracker Map
Imani Marshall
Amherst College
Lindsay Kenney
Matthew White
University of Massachusetts Amherst

This Toxic Facilities map seeks to help community members, policy makers, researchers, and socially conscious investors track toxic air emissions from corporate industrial facilities and determine impacts on surrounding communities. Users can enter an address of interest, which is then highlighted on a map of the contiguous United States, and see all nearby polluting facilities. Fifty-mile buffers surround each facility site, representing potential toxic range, and the associated hazard data can be pulled up by clicking the location point on the map. Further, users may search, filter, and export data for specific facilities using the table located below the map.

Hazard Scores are based only on fugitive air releases and stack emissions reported to the EPA in 2014 (TRI data). Emission amounts were multiplied by Inhalation Toxicity Weights (ITW), which are specific to each chemical, to calculate Hazard Score values (Technical Appendix A, Listing of All Toxicity Weights for TRI Chemicals and Chemical Categories. Political Economy Research Institute). The higher the Hazard Score, the more dangerous the emissions. It is important to note that for some chemicals, ITW values were not available and thus, Hazard Scores for certain facilities may be understated.

 
 
Flood Risks in Coastal Cities and Ramifications for Insurance
John Hossain
Wesleyan University

Boston, New York City, and Washington DC are all coastal cities and economic centers. Therefore, floods in these cities are a continuous problem that can have far-reaching ramifications. Flooding becomes even more of a problem when thinking about rising sea levels and more frequent storms. To address this, this presentation will attempt to quantify damage from floods in these locations from different probabilistic storm events. The presentation will address questions of how far inland flood waters will go and what current infrastructure will be affected. This last question is important as it will have ramifications for insurance costs, and so the presentation will also touch on what variables insurance stakeholders should consider.

A GIS Analysis of Sea Level Rise Impacts on Quincy, Massachusetts
Brian DeMars
Carsten Braun
Westfield State University

Sea level rise (SLR) caused by human-induced global warming is arguably one of the most pressing global environmental issue of our times and the relative impacts of SLR tend to have the greatest effect on the most economically vulnerable people. Glaciers are currently shrinking at accelerated rates and a recent scientific study suggests that SLR could reach more than 6 feet by 2100 and more than 50 feet by 2500 due to potential instabilities of the two Antarctic ice sheets. In Massachusetts, much of the Greater Boston area is situated on the coast and SLR could potentially have a devastating impact on these communities.

The purpose of this GIS-based study was to analyze and visualize the environmental, social, and economic impacts of SLR (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 15 meters) in the town of Quincy, Massachusetts, specifically in terms of inundated town area, number of displaced people, and impacted critical civic and transportation infrastructure. This analysis also includes a more detailed assessment of the socio-economic characteristics of the displaced people as well as SLR impacts on ecological habitat, land use, and freshwater resources.

The results of this analysis are compared to similar assessments such as Climate Central Surging Seas and Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding Impacts by NOAA for consistency and additional context. The presented maps, analysis, and online visualizations can be used to determine a plan of action and to prioritize and implement effective mitigation strategies and adaptation measures as soon as possible.

 
UMass Twitter Chatter
Salma El Idrissi
Aiza Ashraf
Brendan MacGowan
University of Massachusetts Amherst

UMass Twitter Chatter (UTC) is an interactive Web-mapping project carried out for the UMass Amherst PPA 597WG course held in Spring 2016.

UTC is designed for the UMass-Amherst Facilities Programming and Planning Department to track the on and off-campus pulse in Twitter. This project aims at visualizing tweets about UMass by hashtag and location. It also provides a tweets database and visual charts for researchers at UMass.

UTC involves various GIS mapping tools, Web design and Javascript/jQuery libraries, including: Cartodb, Bootstrap, JQcloud.js, Chart.js and randomColor.js.